SMALL BUSINESS

How Employers Can Create a Livable Culture of Go-ahead

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A recent CareerBuilder survey suggests that 21% of workers plan to change jobs this year -– a 17% jump from last year, and the highest percentage since the recession.

VISIT ALSO: Whether You’ve Outgrown Your Home Office

For employers, this turnover rate can be a frightening thought, especially when you consider the potential impact that the loss of an employee can have on productivity and morale. In this competitive environment, many employers are likely wondering how to keep their brightest stars and how to bring promising fresh blood neatly into the fold.

Not long ago, Big Spaceship held a hack day, in which members of our crew could self-organize to produce anything that made our agency a better place. There were a number of results — from solutions for a healthy workplace to tools to appreciate daily moments of humor and joy. Big Spaceship has been evolving its culture for 14 years, but it wasn’t until recently that a printed book -– a rarity in the digital age -– would illuminate the ins and outs of our company values and what they mean to employees new and old.

Turns out, this simple reminder of our values has been a key ingredient in keeping our already tight-knit crew as cohesive as ever. It’s helped the youngest and newest staff members feel engaged and confident, and encouraged the most senior employees to remain open-minded. Culture is organic; it changes and it can’t be dictated by one person.

As your company begins to look inward to attract and retain employees, here are five tips that any business can use to create its own culture manual.

You can’t mandate culture,

A successful manual must be a manifestation of the culture that already exists at your company. Its origins should be completely organic –- a far cry from many corporate environments, in which a single person or committee is responsible for dictating the culture. Remember: Your culture may be encouraged from the top-down, but it will only take hold from the bottom-up.

One of the ways that smart business leaders can spur this phenomenon is by actively putting hiring power into their employees’ hands and allowing them input on who joins their environment.Google, renowned for its organic culture, is a great example of this; the company institutes committees when taking on new hires, naturally helping everyone feel involved and valued.

Balance friendly encouragement with tough love,

People appreciate the honest truth, because it means you respect their intelligence. A lot of things that make a company great require sacrifices, and your manual should tell both sides of the story.

Encourage your employees to ask for help when they need it; feeling supported is absolutely essential to maintaining worker happiness. But don’t let them get too comfortable. Force them to take initiative and, instead of complaining, take it upon themselves to make changes when and how they see fit. Happiness and productivity both stem as equally from independence and confidence as they do from a sense of support.

People will pitch in if you give them freedom and time,

Freedom and time are golden. In the modern workplace, these are two attributes that can be extremely hard to come by — especially when it seems as if every half-hour a new meeting alert pops up. Technology is turning many employees’ ways of life into a vicious cycle, transforming them into slaves to their calendars.

Don’t let your employees become cogs in the wheel. Give them permission to take a step back from the grind and make culture a priority, not an add-on. Sometimes the best brief will say, “Here’s the general space we’re playing in. The rest is up to you.”

Stand for something,

Studies have proven that purpose-driven brands have greater success than those that are only concerned with maximizing shareholder value. But aligning your company with certain beliefs and behaviors also means that not everyone will be a perfect fit within the company’s culture. To be straightforward at Big Spaceship, we list our values on our careers page, because we know it will help attract the right kind of people — and let others know they might be better off elsewhere.

Southwest Airlines is a brand that’s been lauded for being particularly purpose-driven in recent years. They’ve built up a reputation for being hard-working, respectful and, perhaps most importantly, laid back and friendly. They stay away from candidates who don’t fit the bill, and these efforts have paid off: The company has only a 2% turnover rate.

Find the themes that define the way you work,

It’s important that every workplace articulate its unique features and create themes, both internally and externally, that can be narrowed down and shared with all employees.Defining distinct pillars will help your employees feel grounded in their day-to-day, and will keep the sometimes numerous and potentially overwhelming aspects of your culture in perspective.

Zappos is successful at this type of transparency. Its list of ten core values, while a bit lengthy, manages to convey a simple and flexible framework within which its employees can work and play. It’s a strategy that’s worked for us, as well. Our manual has three chapters: the first is about embracing humanity in the workplace, the second is about collaboration and the third is “We Change.”

Dear Patron’s, how do you inspire Go-ahead in the workplace? Share in the comments.

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Whether You’ve Outgrown Your Home Office

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There are numerous reasons to run a business out of your home, with cost savings and an easy commute being the top two. However, there may come a time when the business outgrows the home. Common signs are when boxes of inventory overtake the dining room or you need to invite employees or customers to meet in your living room.

Some people can work successfully from home for years, while others outgrow their home office faster than expected. Here are some of the warning signs that you’re ready to move beyond the home office.

Your home office affects customers or clients,

These days, many people — whether they work for a Fortune 100 company or are self-employed — work from home at least part of the time. While home offices are commonplace, you still need to keep up a level of professionalism to the outside.

If a dog barking, baby crying or roommate’s music interrupts a big call, it might be time to relocate. You need an environment that lets you give clients 100% of your attention when needed.

You can’t separate work and home,

Getting office space outside of the home might be necessary if you find yourself struggling to separate your personal life from your work. For example, do you procrastinate on a big project by doing the dishes or watching TV? Do you find yourself unable to unplug at night?

Sometimes having a physical separation between work and home can help inform your mind when it’s time to focus or relax.

Your house looks more like an office,

Can you walk through your living room without tripping over boxes? Can you eat at your kitchen table without needing to move piles of paper first?

Many people start out working in a spare room, then “work stuff” inevitably migrates to the garage, basement, living room and bedroom. This is particularly true if you’re dealing with any kind of supplies or inventory in the business. If work is invading your home, then it’s time to get more space.

You need to meet with customers and vendors,

Do you ever ask customers or vendors to meet you at your home? Holding meetings on your living room couch or at your kitchen table not only reflects poorly on your business, but also impacts your family or roommates.

You should also consider that increased traffic through your front door can be a red flag for some home associations, and could also affect your homeowners or renters insurance.

You’ve brought on employees,

Many businesses move out of the home once they hire employees who need some kind of workspace.Not every employee is going to want to work in your home, use your personal bathroom or listen to your family discussions.

If your employees can’t work out of their own homes, then it’s only fair that you set up a more conventional office environment so they have the space and resources to do their job. In addition, many homeowners’ policies won’t cover liability for your employees.

You want to be more visible,

Not every business will benefit from a local presence, but some will. Having a physical office with street signage gives your brand local visibility 24 hours a day.

Alternatively, working out of a shared office, executive suite or incubator environment will automatically expand your network of potential customers, partners, and vendors.

You’re stagnating at home,

Maybe you feel you’ve reached a plateau with your business — it’s difficult to get motivated or find inspiration for new ideas. Or maybe you feel like your original home office no longer reflects how your business has grown over the years.

In these cases, you may want to shake things up with a new physical space, and get inspired by joining a community of fellow startups, small businesses and professionals.

Taking the Plunge,

Once you’ve decided it’s time to move out of your home office, you don’t necessarily need to purchase commercial space or sign a longterm lease.

Consider your needs. If inventory and excess boxes are the main issues, maybe you’d benefit from storage space. If you’re looking for a quiet place to concentrate a few times a week for big projects, then you should consider a shared office or executive office center where you can rent space on a part-time or even as-needed basis. There are also co-working and incubator environments for those who’d benefit from the energy and support of a community.

Ways to Trick Out Your Startup’s Office Environment

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Last week we showed you some of the startup world’s most creative office spaces. These colorful environments with airy floor plans and comfortable conference rooms put the cubicle to shame — but before you start shelling out for employee skate parks and rock climbing walls, consider that not all office luxuries will serve your workspace equally well.

Mashable spoke with several startup employees to find out what they loved about their unconventional office spaces, and the results were fairly unanimous: An open floor plan and quirky extras encourage communication, collaboration and general satisfaction far more than cramped cubicles.

“The more comfortable our employees feel in the office environment, the more comfortable they are to speak up and share their opinions and insights with the team,” ZocDoc CFO Netta Samroengraja says in an e-mail.

Most startups have certain crucial design elements in common. These include employee lounge areas with cozy seating and colorful accents, snack-filled kitchens where employees can chat as they refuel and TV monitors used for everything from video-conferencing to gaming.

Startups with enough square footage also tend to shell out for recreational spaces — ZocDoc has a game room outfitted with beanbag chairs, a ping-pong table and an acoustic guitar — that contribute to a playful work environment that’s not just about punching the clock.

Some office add-ons will make sense for only a small segment of businesses; TastingTable, for instance, rents a test kitchen and dining room staffed with two full-time chefs near its SoHo offices. The extra kitchen space is a boon for the food-and-drink newsletter, but is probably a less prudent investment for a software firm.

At Zazzle’s sprawling Redwood City headquarters, everything from the communal desks to the wallpaper was custom-made to reflect the company’s design-it-yourself ethic, according to co-founder and CTO Bobby Beaver. Likewise, Etsy takes a DIY approach to office design with colorful knickknacks, quilts and plushies, all made by Etsy sellers. “My apartment is so boring compared to the office,” says Sarah Starpoli, Etsy’s Employment Experience Manager.

Quirky office additions such as HowAboutWe’s popcorn machine — which one employee assures us is regularly put to good use — or Zazzle’s ping-pong table may not rank as “strictly necessary” for your startup, but they undoubtedly contribute to a more welcoming work environment. “Go to your local IRS office to get a taste of the dark side of an office landscape,”Squarespace’s director of interface, Michael Heilemann, suggests.

There is, however, a fine line between a morale-boosting office perk and a misallocation of your startup’s precious funds. So, when you’re decorating that new exposed-brick loft space, go the more sensible route and avoid the 10 extravagant accessories in the gallery below — ball pits, bike repair shops and Bengal tigers are on the list — that only Google and Facebook can really afford, at least until you’ve made your first million.

Tips for the Resourceful Small Business

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Small businesses must be resourceful to stay afloat. With smaller budgets, big ideas need to be as proactive as they are cost-efficient, taking into account everything from consistent industry changes, cash flow, customer needs and the unexpected challenges you never saw coming. Multitasking to keep up with the big guys on a fraction of the budget is why small businesses have become notorious for bootstrapping, and being creative about their approach to staying competitive.

When push comes to shove, small business owners get scrappy. We spoke with seven entrepreneurs about how they do more with less and why it gives them the winning edge.

Use Time Wisely,

Laura Kenney, founder and editor-in-chief of YouBeauty.com, has set up a process to make sure cool things get done well and that the right things get prioritized.

“There are so many opportunities to explore daily: mind-blowing new video experiences, smart ways to serve up your content to readers, social sharing tools, new ways to improve the shopping experience. It’s enough to make your head explode, and you could spend all day learning about these and no time actually working on your site’s real-time goals. It’s easy to get lost in the cool ideas,” she said.

“We’ve put a process into place to control this, with weekly priorities meetings, to put the right people in the room to decide what to move forward with, what to reconsider, and tag a priority to each goal so that our development team has clear direction on which task to do first.”

Be Smart About Customer Feedback,

Jojo Hedaya, co-founder of Unroll.me, a service that rolls out your emails throughout the day rather than all at once, knows the value of listening to your customers, but being resourceful about what you do to address it.

“User feedback is very important, but a lot of times users think they want something that could end up hurting their experience. That’s why tracking a user’s behavior is super important. You must use the feedback that your power users give you and combine that with their behavioral data,” he said.

“At Unroll.me we get go through all of our user feedback and have daily discussions during our morning stand-up. We then decide if any of the feedback is worth moving on. We then put together the simplest test and track, track, track.”

You’ve Heard It Before, But Hire Well,

A lot of startups and small businesses focus on culture when it comes to who they hire — so personality has to be a match — but Alexa Hirschfeld, co-founder of Paperless Post, knows that when hiring, while a good fit matters, you cannot skimp on skill.

“Never compromise on the quality of a new hire in a small company. If need be, contract with super talented people who you can’t hire yet to get to know them. Recognize that skill comes first and personality comes second, but if the personality is wrong, still don’t hire someone.”

Don’t Sell Out Just Yet,

For some small business owners, the opportunity to sell to a larger corporation with the big money backup that will help to propel an entrepreneur’s idea into the big leagues can be tempting. On the other hand, Lee Hnetinka, co-founder and CEO at WunWun, the app that gets you what you want when you want it, says to hold on tight and for as long as you can.

“Do it for as long as you can, and you’ll keep more of your company in the end. This said, if a good deal comes your way take it. This is a tricky bet and you need to know the right time to take [your idea] outside.”

Ask Around,

What small businesses lack in budgets, they gain in a network of like-minded entrepreneurs who have been there before. Alban Denoyel, co-founder and CEO at Sketchfab.com, says that bootstrapping is a team sport, and more people than you think want to play.

“When you need or want something, just ask for it! You’ll be surprised how often people are more willing to help than not. Most entrepreneurs are willing to help each other.”

Never Stop Looking,

Most small business owners know that bootstrapping is a necessity, and finding the most resourceful solutions is key to survival. Joe Lallouz, co-founder at Grand St., a marketplace for creative, small-batch gadgets, says it’s important to always keep your ear to the ground.

“Resourcefulness is an entrepreneur’s best friend. In order to succeed, you need to move quickly and do whatever it takes to get things done. The reality is that startups are always bootstrapping something, whether it is an experimental feature, a new business model or the entire company.”

Dream Big,

And though bootstrapping is about being on your toes and coming up with creative solutions, Alex Winter, founder and CEO of Placemeter, says to be careful about what you accept as success.

Lessons that Every Startups should Know

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Startups big and small across northern Europe and Russia met in Helsinki this week for tech startup conference Slush to discuss which trends are surging within the space. Some tips to budding companies are simple (“stay focused” and “think ahead”) but hearing cautionary tales and words of wisdom could breathe new perspective into your own approach.

Here’s a look at what to keep in mind during the early stages of growing a startup from those who have been there before.

Be open,

William Wolfram, founder of ecommerce company DealDash, which is valued at $100, believes startups shouldn’t be put off by criticism from venture capitalists in the search for funding.

“It’s basically free advice,” Wolfrom said. “A founder should walk away from a meeting with what they need to work on and what they should do. You can get so much value and feedback from VCs, even if they don’t want to invest.”

Differentiate,

Supercell CEO Ilkka Paananen found much success with his 3-year-old company, which is the force behind two of the most popular iOS apps worldwide right now: combat strategy gameClash of the Clans and social farming game Hay Day. But his advice to startups is to stay creative and celebrate failures.

“Don’t just look at what’s popular in the App Store and see how you can do something along those lines,” he said. “Try and create something new and exciting.”

Supercell also embraces each product failure with a bottle of champagne. “We celebrate failures,” Paananen said. “We don’t pretend failing is fun — people dedicate their lives to gaming production and sometimes the products get killed — but we get so much from that failure. We analyze and talk about what went well and what didn’t. We pop a bottle of champagne to celebrate what we learned.”

Stay selective,

Many will offer advice, but be selective with what tips you actually follow. But if we listened to everyone, we’d be chasing our own tails. Some said making free-to-play apps is the only way to approach mobile, but because we are doing interactive storytelling, that would have been really hard to do.”

Get balanced,

Markus Haltunnen, whose startup Small Giant launched in February, said a well-rounded founding team is crucial for success.

“Make sure your founding team is well balanced. It’s not enough that you have a group of talented people working together,” he said. “We had two graphic designers and one developer, but we knew we needed something more. It’s important to identity gaps in skill or knowledge. We were lucky to get someone else on the team who had experience talking to investors and that was key while we looked for funding.”

Think years ahead,

Tiina Zillacus, founder of the Yoga Retreat app, said it is key to consider what you need to keep your company thriving beyond the present. “If you need investors, raise enough money for the next level while still playing the current one,” Zillacus said. “Even if someone isn’t interested now, they could be later. It’s about building relationships and thinking ahead, not just what you need now but what you might need two years from now.”

Zillacus also said to approach investors who might have a specific interest in your category. “When you walk into a room of suits, they might not make decisions based on what you want (such as, for our company, their health),” she said. “Once I developed an eye for who might be right for our own interests, it was much easier to gain awareness.”

Forget the competition,

Knowing your competition is one thing, but don’t let it fuel your every move.

“You’re more likely to be killed by lack of focus than competition,” said Juha Paananen, CEO and cofounder of Singapore-based Nonstop Games. “Some companies look too much at what competitors are doing and don’t focus on themselves.”

Market yourself,

Will Kassoy, CEO at AdColony and former senior VP of global marketing at gaming company Activision | Blizzard, said many early startups believe a strong concept is enough to get really noticed — but it’s not.

Ways To Twine Up Your Startup

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There’s no doubt that us Gen-Yers are an entrepreneurial generation. We’ve been raised by parents who found success and who want nothing more than for us to exceed their own level of success. We’ve been given the educational opportunities to reach for success (even if that education was overpriced). And after our initial 20+ years or so of chasing that success, we’ve arrived at an economy, which has no place for us.

Even though the national unemployment rate has fallen to a respectable 7.4 percent, our generation is carrying the brunt of that, with 5.5 million 20-somethings still unemployed. Even those of us lucky enough to at least be earning a steady paycheck are often overqualified for our jobs, or deeply dissatisfied with the kind of work we’re stuck doing. It’s no surprise, then, that our generation has turned to entrepreneurship as a solution. Can’t find a job? Have a job, but hate your boss? Tired of long hours of pointless work? Start your own company!

But, just because you have the enthusiasm, energy, and a good idea doesn’t mean you’ll make it. Business acumen doesn’t come naturally to all of us – even those of us with an MBA – and mistakes in start-ups can be rampant and even deadly to a young company. What seems like a great idea, and may even be a great idea at a larger company, can be poison to a start up. So, here’s a list of some of the most common mistakes start-ups make and how to avoid them in your own.

Increasing inter-office communication,

Here’s the problem with emails and meetings: people don’t read emails, and they don’t pay attention in meetings. Sure, sometimes emails or meetings are necessary, but nothing is more valuable than your time and the time of the people you work with. So, only send the emails and hold the meetings that are absolutely necessary and keep them short.

Respect the time of your coworkers, employees and clients, and acknowledge the fact that no one’s going to read a big block of text that shows up in their inbox. Instead, try text messages or programs like Asana to keep communication short, sweet and to-the-point.

Rent a big office to impress potential investors,

Absolutely do not make the mistake of thinking that appearance is everything (it’s important, but it’s not everything). Working out of an office you rent when you could just as easily work out of your home or local coffee shop is nothing more than a blatant waste of money. When it comes to attracting investors, it’s downright business suicide. To an investor’s eyes, unnecessary office space is unnecessary overhead – nothing more than a waste of money.

Make big promises,

Think a task is going to take you a week? Say it will take you two weeks. Think a project is going to cost $500? Say it will cost $600, or even $700. While you don’t want to overestimate to the point of scaring away potential clients, you don’t want to set up any clients for disappointment, either. In any business, whether it’s a start-up or otherwise, the best bet is to under-promise and over-serve.

If you tell a client something will cost $500, and you end up going over budget, you’re met with anger and disappointment. On the other hand, if you tell a client something will cost $600, but it costs $500, you’re met with pleasant surprise, gratitude, and most importantly, a satisfied customer.

Grow too quickly,

Growth for a start-up is exciting! But remember that bigger doesn’t necessarily mean better. Growth should always be sustainable, and if you have to overstretch your resources or go into an unreasonable amount of debt to take the next step for your company, maybe it’s not the right next step. Remain budget-conscious and prudent enough to assess and exercise risk carefully, and don’t forget your roots – why you started the company and what you want it to stand for. If growth happens too quickly, or heads in the wrong direction, you risk doing so at the expense of your original idea, product quality, or company values.

Plan, plan, plan

Planning is great. It’s exciting to come up with new ideas and dream for the future. The problem is when the future never becomes the present. Most of us have big ideas we would like to see come to fruition, but when it comes to execution, we never seem to be able to get around to it. We get bogged down in the planning.

When you’re in a start-up, you might spend a lot of time discussing plans for the future, but you’d better spend even more time actually doing the things you’ve envisioned. Procrastinating is always easier than being proactive, so quit daydreaming and pondering the “what-if’s.” Stand up and make it happen. It’s really that simple.

Attitude begins from You then Spreads around you

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Some people have it, others don’t. Most will agree that we are all hungry for power, yet most of us don’t actually have a clue as to what exactly makes a person powerful. It’s not physical strength — that much we can all agree on. No, it’s something completely different; something that eludes most people simply because it is so difficult to define. We are all power hungry in one form or another.

Some of us like to be in charge of others. Some of us like to feel that we are smarter, wittier or more intelligent than others. Those of us that are most misguided believe that power requires hurting others. Some believe it comes with money — others believe that it comes with the connections that one makes through various paths of networking. But being powerful is actually much simpler than that — simpler to understand, but much more difficult to ascertain.

Being powerful requires more than one or two traits or a couple of extra zeros at the end of your bank account. We are not born with power, we create it. Each and every one of us has the potential to become powerful; it just takes understanding a few key concepts that are necessary for gaining the one single tool that has brought success to every person that has ever experienced successful.

It All Begins With How You Perceive Yourself

It’s not the car you drive or the apartment that you live in. It’s not the clothing you wear or the watch around your wrist. Power does not exist in possessions — it exists in you. If you want to be powerful then you must first believe yourself to be powerful. The way that we perceive ourselves projects to the outside world more than most of us realize. We may believe that while in private we can abuse ourselves, feel sorry for ourselves, make excuses for ourselves and no one would ever be the wiser, but that’s a load of crap. Others will notice, but more importantly you are allowing yourself to belittle yourself. You are allowing yourself to overlook your true potential.

Before you can project power, you must first embrace it. You must come to learn your strengths and, more importantly, your weaknesses. You must learn to give credit to yourself when it is due. I feel as if too many people these days are either too easy on themselves or too harsh. You aren’t perfect, and neither am I or anyone else in the world.

We all have character flaws and habits that need to be changed, but that’s the point of life. No one starts off successful, they have to work for it. However, if you can’t even learn to appreciate yourself and all that you are capable of then your journey has finished before it has even begun. You were born with the ability to be great, now take the opportunity that has been given to you and allow the feeling of power to wash over you.

Once You Perceive Yourself As Powerful, You Need To Make Others Perceive The Same

Why is it that when certain people walk into the room, the walls seem to come closer in, making them seem larger and everything and everyone else a bit smaller? It’s the same reason that people avoid conversations with certain people at a bar. We regularly look at people and can clearly tell what mood they are in, what kind of day they had, what kind of people they are most likely to be. This isn’t simple guessing; it’s perceiving body posture and micro expressions in peoples’ faces that allow us to judge them.

Some of us are more receptive at picking up on such gestures and cues than others. Some are completely incapable and almost always suffer from some sort of mental illness or disability. However, the average person can — to a relatively minute margin of error — correctly read how a person perceives him or herself. We can go beyond gestures, expressions and posture.

We look at how a person dresses, talks, moves and interacts with others. Everything that we do, how we look, what we talk about — all of it clearly defines who we are as individuals and, to a certain extent, gives others a peek into who we really are, into our “souls.” If power is what you are after then you must first realize that you already have it, that you already are powerful. Understand what it is that you really are capable of and those around you will quickly see a change in you.

Another very important part of having power is having control. If you have control over something, it is said that you have power over it. When you are capable of having a certain amount of control over others that is when the power that is already in you starts to work for you in the outside world. This is not manipulation, you simply are able to present things in certain ways to people — in ways that better the chances of you getting what you want. You do not lie, you emphasize what matters.

Just as you have control over how others perceive you by understanding the power that you already have, you can also use your power to maximize your successful endeavors. To have power is to recognize that you already have it and to then use the knowledge that you have it and that others recognize it in a way that allows you to prosper.

Why is it that when certain people walk into the room, the walls seem to come closer in, making them seem larger and everything and everyone else a bit smaller? It’s the same reason that people avoid conversations with certain people at a bar. We regularly look at people and can clearly tell what mood they are in, what kind of day they had, what kind of people they are most likely to be. This isn’t simple guessing; it’s perceiving body posture and micro expressions in peoples’ faces that allow us to judge them.

Some of us are more receptive at picking up on such gestures and cues than others. Some are completely incapable and almost always suffer from some sort of mental illness or disability. However, the average person can — to a relatively minute margin of error — correctly read how a person perceives him or herself. We can go beyond gestures, expressions and posture.

We look at how a person dresses, talks, moves and interacts with others. Everything that we do, how we look, what we talk about — all of it clearly defines who we are as individuals and, to a certain extent, gives others a peek into who we really are, into our “souls.” If power is what you are after then you must first realize that you already have it, that you already are powerful. Understand what it is that you really are capable of and those around you will quickly see a change in you.

Another very important part of having power is having control. If you have control over something, it is said that you have power over it. When you are capable of having a certain amount of control over others that is when the power that is already in you starts to work for you in the outside world. This is not manipulation, you simply are able to present things in certain ways to people — in ways that better the chances of you getting what you want. You do not lie, you emphasize what matters.

Just as you have control over how others perceive you by understanding the power that you already have, you can also use your power to maximize your successful endeavors. To have power is to recognize that you already have it and to then use the knowledge that you have it and that others recognize it in a way that allows you to prosper.

In A World Full OF wrong, It’s The Actions That Count

Control is crucial. We want to have control over as much as we can in our lives while recognizing and accepting the things that we have no control over. What every individual should aim for is having complete control of themselves — body and mind. This is the point at which we begin developing and growing our innate power. We are capable of so much more than any of us realize.

The issue is that we are not trained to focus intently enough for long enough for that power to manifest itself in the outside world. In order to influence the world outside of ourselves we must act. Without action there is no change. The more precise and exact the action, the clearer the result. The more frequent the action, the more likely the actions will result in our favor. Power is only worth having if it is used in the one place where it really matters: in your mind.

To unleash your power you have no choice but to have a handle — control — over your thoughts. We should learn to direct our thoughts the best that we can and focus them on what matters most to us — what we want, why we want it and the actions that are necessary steps towards success. Once you have control over your mind you will have control over your body and your actions.

Once you have control of your actions you have better control over your life. Of course, life adds too many uncontrollable variables into the equation to ever be entirely certain of an outcome, but life is a game of chances; all we can do is make sure we have the best chances we can have. Having such control, such power, allows you to direct your life on whichever path you may choose. All that is left is chance. Having power is giving yourself the best chance at the best life you could possibly have. Why wouldn’t anyone want that for themselves?